Original photo by Matt Doyle.

Original photo by Matt Doyle.

WILD HEROINE
TRACEE ELLIS ROSS
WARRIOR

As the daughter of one of the most legendary R&B divas of all time, one could say Tracee Ellis Ross got fed fabulousness with a silver spoon. Although she carries the name of her famous mother, Diana Ross, Tracee has blazed her own path as an actress, model, contributing fashion editor, comedian, and advocate for women, especially women of color.  She is on of the founders of the #metoo movement and an inspiring TED Talk speaker. She is an absolute teacher of self-love.

She already became ‘the friend in our head’ when she debuted on the small screen as Joan Clayton, a neurotic lawyer/mother hen to a group of friends in the LA sitcom Girlfriends. But her role as Dr. Rainbow Johnson in the critically acclaimed comedy series Black-ish, turned us into super fans while propelling Tracee to the Hollywood A-list. She received a Golden Globe, Emmy nomination (the first black woman in three decades to receive an Emmy nomination) and several NAACP Image Awards for her part in the show.

Tracee shows us that you can be glamorous and elegant as well as silly and funny.
Between her 4 million plus followers on Instagram, her buzzing YouTube channel and addictive Pinterest boards, Tracee Ellis Ross keeps us entertained and most of all inspired by her bravery, immense power and of course her amazing sense of style.

WILD MONARCHY CROWNS TRACEE " WILD HEROINE WARRIOR"

 

Some Tracee wisdom

"MY LIFE IS MINE"

Her speech at  Glamour Magazine’s 2017 Women of the year summit is one for the books. It was all about living for yourself, your true self. Not being afraid of what others might think or live up to other people’s expectations of life. Owning your power and sexuality. Let your brave self out. “so let her out, let her have her glory. This beautiful, powerful part of you is just waiting for your invitation.”

Watch the whole speech here, you might want to sit down for this. If you've already seen it, it doesn’t hurt to watch it again.

‘THIS IS FOR ALL OF THE WOMEN, WOMEN OF COLOR AND COLORFUL PEOPLE, WHOSE STORIES, IDEAS, THOUGHTS ARE NOT ALWAYS CONSIDERED WORTHY, AND VALID AND IMPORTANT. BUT I WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT I SEE YOU.  WE SEE YOU. ‘

In her ACCEPTANCE Speech for the Best Performance by an Actress at the 2017 Annual Golden Globe Awards, she highlighted the show's role in promoting diversity on television. “It is an honor to be on this show, ‘Black-ish,’ to continue expanding the way we are seen and known, and to show the magic and the beauty and the sameness of a story, and stories that are outside of where the industry usually looks.” A truly powerful and importnant speech brought with so much positive enegry and excitment .

‘I LIKE TO INSPIRE PEOPLE TO FEEL COMFORTABLE IN THEIR OWN SKIN. I JUST STRONGLY PROMOTE PUSHING AGAINST THIS CULTURE OF PERFECTION. I MEAN, IM SORRY, FOR ME, SPANX JUST DON’T FEEL GOOD.’

In an interview with The New York times, Tracee explains  fighting against this culture of perfection. What we deserve is a to be ourselves and let our bodies be. Being yourself is more important than trying to try to fit in or cramp yourself in a waist trainer. “I’m trying to find my own version of what makes me feel beautiful.”

‘I JUST WANT TO SAY THIS. I LOVE BEING A WOMAN. I LOVE PLAYING A WOMAN. I LOVE BEING A WHOLE AND FULL WOMAN. I AM MORE THAN MY PARTS, AND WE ALL ARE. AND WE ALL, AS WOMEN, NEED TO CONTINUE TO CHANGE OUR GAZE FROM HOW WE ARE SEEN TO HOW WE ARE SEEING. WE ARE FULL AND BEAUTIFUL WOMEN. AND LET US LIVE IN THAT.’

Winning Outstanding Actress at the NAACP Image Awards in 2015 Tracee gave us another empowering, beautiful and motivating speech on being more than just looks. "We are brains, we are workers, we are loving and we are warriors." Tracee knows how to get us feeling all those female feminist fantastic feels.

Can't get enough of Tracee either? check out her website. It's  a diary, fashion magazine and pintrest board all in one; It's beautiful and breathes black girl magic! www. traceeellisross.com

 

Written by Charlene heezen & Nancy steeman

Nancy Steeman